Archive for the ‘Article Abstracts’ Category

Tara Donovan article abstract

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

The Wall Street Journal

December 24, 2008

Leisure and Arts, Section J, 1035 words

Title: Art: Magician of Man-Made Materials

Author: Lance Esplund

 This article reviews the 2008 exhibition of works by sculptor Tara Donovan at The Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, Massachusetts. The author discusses Donovan’s transformations of common materials such as pencils, buttons or Styrofoam cups as she explores their properties of shape, texture, translucency and malleability. She then layers stacks and binds thousands, if not millions, of the same material together to create her minimalist sculptures. The author likes Donovan’s success at creating “allusions and illusions”  in her work by using multiples of a material to produce forms that resemble something else.  Donovan considers her work “site responsive” as she often re-installs or re-scales her works to fit the venue. The author describes what he calls the “ah ha” experience where the viewer is no longer engaged in the effect of the whole piece, but rather focuses on identifying the individual elements of common, everyday material. The result of this viewer experience is that the true transformation is lost and the work loses its ability to become more than the sum of its parts.

Oofus, Sunny, and Long Tail Dexter Face Review

Wednesday, October 1st, 2008

This article reviews Ken Price’s exhibition at Matthew Marks in New York City. His pieces embody a sci-fi characteristic in the way they are shaped and painted. In addition to their individual characters and personality, established by their positioning and form, Price gives his pieces names as their titles, such as Oofus, Sonny, and Long Tail Dexter. These pieces mimic living organisms while being limited to the laws of gravity in their blob-like appearance. The weighty, sagging aspect suggests an erotic undertone resembling parts of the human body. Koplos describes Price’s painting process as repetitive that not only leaves no hint of his touch, but emphasizes the form and character of the piece. Koplos writes about Price’s exhibition, saying that he has found a style of his own that allows his forms to be what they are, without reasoning or identification.


Art in America

Volume: 92

Issue: 4

Date: April 2004

Pages: 124-125

Author: Janet Koplos

Say Hello To My Little Friend…Named Long Tailed Dexter

Thursday, September 18th, 2008

Name of Periodical: Art in America

Volume: 92

Issue: 4

Date: April 2004

Pages: 124-125

Author: Janet Koplos

Abstract:

This article reviews Ken Price’s exhibition at Matthew Marks in New York City. His pieces embody a sci-fi characteristic in the way they are shaped and painted. In addition to their individual characters and personality, established by their positioning and form, Price gives his pieces names as their titles, such as Oofus, Sonny, and Long Tail Dexter. These pieces mimic living organisms while being limited to the laws of gravity in their blob-like appearance. The weighty, sagging aspect suggests an erotic undertone resembling parts of the human body. Koplos describes Price’s painting process as repetitive that not only leaves no hint of his touch, but emphasizes the form and character of the piece. Koplos writes about Price’s exhibition, saying that he has found a style of his own that allows his forms to be what they are, without reasoning or identification.

Life and Death and David Altmejd

Monday, September 8th, 2008

Sculpture Magazine, Volume 26

Michael Amy “Sculpture As Living Organism: A Conversation With David Altmejd.”

December 2007, p. 22-29

David Altmejd, of Montreal, Canada, represented Canada in the 52nd Venice Biennale in 2007. Exhibited there was his work “The Index,” featuring werewolves, mirrors, birds, and glass. His original plan to turn his exhibition space into an aviary grew into the idea of parts of a whole becoming one organism. Although frequently depicting death, Altmejd describes his work as being more clearly about life because of its juxtaposition against dead objects. Other contrasts and contradictions are common throughout his pieces. The image of the werewolf comes from Altmejd’s desire to depict a fragmented body, a la Kiki Smith and Louise Bourgeois. Altmejd also looks to Dana Schutz, Paul McCarthy, Cindy Sherman, and Mike Kelley for artistic inspiration, and to Jorge Luis Borges for inspiration from a literary perspective.

Burns Burned Over Warhol Film

Monday, September 8th, 2008

David Ebony, editor of Art in America, reviews Ric Burns’ film, “Andy Warhol:A Documentary Film,” which premiered on televisions PBS after a short theatrical run in New York. In the two-part film, Burns examines the life of Warhol, from his underprivileged childhood in Pittsburgh in Part I, entitled “Raggedy Andy,” to the last two eventful decades of Warhol’s career, highlighted in Part II, “Drella.” Burns’ access to the Pittsburgh Andy Warhol Museum gives viewers a rare look into the childhood of Warhol and to 8mm footage of the artist at work in the early days of the Factory. The film documents Warhol’s struggle to find “creditability, acceptance and fame as a fine artist” and more than just meager commercial success. Irving Blum and Donna De Salvo are among the art experts to give interviews, while Warhol’s brother, John Warhola, and the artist’s 1960’s assistant, Billy Name, also provide insight to Warhol’s word. With his honest opinions, Ebony gives a sincere critique of Burns’ work and holds nothing back to the improvements he believes could be made regarding some important aspects of Warhol’s life.

Patches Millicenta Little Bill Rainbow Pancake Macquesy-English-Oliver

Art in America. November 2006. Page 41. “From “Raggedy Andy” to “Drella”- Warhol for TV”

Cracking walls expose Gold-sworthy

Monday, September 8th, 2008

A year ago at the Galerie Lelong, Andy Goldsworthy slathered four walls of a conventional gallery space with a thick layer of mud and let the elements take their natural course. The installment, titled White Walls, which took on aspects of performance art, began to crack and peel off the walls within hours and even more so within a few days. Goldsworthy’s piece attempted to draw a bridge between the artist and the artwork. It brought to life questions of when a piece of artwork actually begins and ends, or if there ever truly is a beginning or an ending. The piece formed a life of its own, bringing to the light yet another question of how much of the artist is actually present, and does that presence, or lack of presence still create art. Goldsworthy continues to astonish his viewers by seamlessly melting together natural elements with a twist of man made genius.

Art News

Volume 106

September 2007

Page 148

Eric Bryant

The Death of Articles on Jasper Johns

Monday, September 8th, 2008

by Jade F. Angler

In researching for this abstract, the most recent article worth reading, besides reviews of shows, was one from 2002. Has the world suddenly forgotten about Jasper Johns? Is Flag no longer relevant to the modern day artist?

Marcel Duchamps Tu m

Marcel Duchamp's Tu m'

While Jasper Johns’ According to What and Marcel Duchamp’s Tu m’ have been compared before, Wallace explores deeper connections between Duchamp and Johns’ works and their relationship to the death of painting as well as each other. Both pieces are essentially accounts of Duchamp and Johns at crossroads in their lives as they deal with their own histories in painting as they collide with the history of painting itself. According to What further served to open up the lines of communication about the connection between painting and readymades which was originally stirred up by Johns’ Flag through which he shows that works of modernists and readymades are one and the same. Johns seeks to revisit Duchamp’s death of painting theme by not only recreating this theme, but by re-envisioning it and referencing authorship and originality; two of the most important topics of readymade art. Ultimately though, Johns is able to reach beyond the clichéd metaphors Duchamp employs and faces the reality that the picture plane is no longer a unified ideal.

Jasper Johns' According to What

Title: “From Painting’s Death to the Death in Painting, or what jasper johns found in marcel duchamp’s tu m’/tomb

Personal Author: Isabel Wallace

Journal Name: Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities

Source: Angelaki v. 7 no. 1 (april 2002) p.133-156

Sensual Articulations of the Disturbing

Monday, September 8th, 2008

Although briefly deemed flash-in-the-pan, the work of Inka Essenhigh has recently reemerged as a powerful, mature, and enduring series of creations. Eight paintings, each in Essenhigh’s stylistic “Art-Nouveau-meets-biomorphic-Surrealism-meets-Japanimation,” transform the events of everyday life into sensual, exaggerated forms emboldened by undercurrents of horrific deformity and violence. Screaming Victim offers up cartoon-esq depictions of various body parts–anatomy that is both beautiful in its clarity of line and monstrous in its subtle subject matter. However, not all of Essenhigh’s works adhere to a formula of oil paint and violence; Romantic Painting breathes life into a single bodied, two-headed organic sea-being–“an act of coitus no mortal has ever experienced.” Inka Essenghigh’s smooth articulations of the erotic and horrific provide images not likely to settle back into oblivion.

Source:

Art In America: April 2003 Vol. 9

Issue 4

p.131

Hirst’s Shark Swap

Monday, September 8th, 2008

Damien Hirst’s now famous embalmed shark, entitled “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), has now become the center of attention for an entirely new reason.

The steady decay of the shark, which was not properly embalmed, has prompted Hirst to completely replace the fourteen foot Tiger shark with a new specimen. As Pernilla Holmes discusses in her article “Meet the New Shark”, this replacement has raised questions about whether or not the piece should still be considered the same work. Some argue that since it is a conceptual work the physical components are unimportant. Others say that regardless of the concept remaining unchanged, once the work is physically altered it cannot legitimately be considered the same piece.

With the replacement of the shark came similar concerns about the replacement of Hirst’s other preserved animal pieces. Hirst has issued a statement saying that he will help to refurbish any of his pieces over ten years old. This however raises the new question of what should be done with the pieces once the artist is no longer available to refurbish them, and whether regardless of current preservation attempts the pieces will nevertheless be doomed to rot.

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ARTnews vol. 106 no. 9 October 2007

p.102-104

written by Pernilla Holmes

Audrey Flack Abstrack

Monday, September 8th, 2008

Audrey Flack. By: Nadelman, Cynthia. Sep2002, Vol. 101 Issue 8, p155, 0p, 1 color.

Abstract: Review of Audrey Flack exhibition of life drawings and plein air watercolors at the Bernarducci.Meisel gallery in New York City. The works depict nude, female models outdoors in Flack’s typically rich, over-the-top style in terms of the use and application of color and the exaggeration and hyper-feminization of the subjects’ features. However, “the models are not presented as objects of desire, but individuals displaying their desires.” An example, Cindy With Black Lace, 2001, mixed media 19”x 24” depicts a contemplative blond model in make-up and polished nails reclining in lace underwear. Produced shortly after 9-11, Flack reacts to the chaos around her by depicting—in contrast to other works in her oeuvre—an atypically safe and predictable world. Works in the series were produced in charcoal, and white and colored chalks on various types of paper.

-Ernest Ernst


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